Seek for a Super spine

January 4, 2016

 

 

Spine strength equals true power

 

There are a hundred exercises out there that help develop your legs, arms, chest, abs and so on.  There is one exercise that actually develops the muscles of your spine to be flexible and strong hence I hardly ever see anyone practising the bridge.  What people don’t understand is that the most important organ on the human body after the brain is the spinal cord, and through the spine cord the brain communicates with the rest of the body.  In order to keep the spinal cord strong it is necessary to keep the ligaments and muscles that support it healthy (spinal erectors).   Apart from avoiding injury the spinal muscles can assist athleticism and also increase strength.

 

Bridging is very important especially nowadays with the life we lead. Even if you just do it once every week it will still help realign the vertebrae into the correct position and in addition will strengthen the deep muscles of the back responsible for your posture. Furthermore, the legs and the arms, the shoulders, the upper back, the knees, hip flexors, knees, abdominals and chest benefit from bridging; and it also allows you to train harder, heavier and faster since it makes the spinal column stronger.

 

To start doing bridges you need to have a plan. No one is expecting you to start immediately from a full bridge, instead take your time and progress step-by-step working on your basic strength and the first steps of bridging. Below you will find a few steps to assist you to achieve a full bridge.

 

Step one: short bridge

  • Lay down on an even floor

  • Arms on the side of the body, bend the knees, and bring the heels close to your glutes.

  • Push through your feet and bring the hips off the floor

  • Hold the position for a few seconds and then with total control take the hips back to the starting position.

Step two: table bridge

  • Sit down on an even floor

  • Place the hands on the floor next to your hips

  • Bend your knees, and bring the heels closer to your glutes (feet in contact with the floor)

  • Push through your feet and hands to raise the hips off the floor

  • Chin facing the ceiling

  • Hold the position and when appropriate bring the hips down to the floor with total control of the movement

Step three: straight bridge

  • Sit down on an even floor

  • Place the hands on the floor next to your hips and extend your legs

  • Feet and legs together

  • Push through your feet and hands to raise the hips off the floor, keep the legs straight

  • Chin facing the ceiling

  • Hold the position and when appropriate bring the hips down to the floor with total control of the movement

Step four: Wall Bridge

  • Stand an arm’s length away from a firm wall

  • Feet width wider than your shoulders, weight equally spread

  • Bend slightly the knees and place your hands on the wall fingers facing towards the floor

  •  Start walking with your hands towards the floor and pause when your body is arched with some weight going through your hands

  • Chin facing the ceiling

  • Hold the position and when appropriate bring the hips down to the floor with total control of the movement

Step five: full bridge

  • Lay down on a clear floor

  • Bend your knees, bring the feet close to your glutes with the soles of your feet touching the floor

  • Place your hands next to your head with the fingers pointing to your feet

  • Push through your hands and feet and pause when your body is arched and the weight is equally spread on your hands and feet.

  • Chin facing the ceiling

  • Hold the position and when appropriate bring the hips down to the floor with total control of the movement

 

 

 

*credits to the kavadlo brothers 

 

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